Girls Season 3 Episode 7 Recap: “Beach House From Hell”

Halfway through each of the first two seasons of Girls, we got a “special episode”. In both “The Return” and “One Man’s Trash” we say goodbye to Shosh, Marnie, and Jessa, and follow Hannah around for a special vignette. Both episodes feature Hannah outside of her normal Brooklyn twentysomething world. Whether she’s back home in Iowa or fucking Patrick Wilson in his beautiful Brown Stone, these adventures forced her to look at her life from an outside perspective, without the influence of the other girls.
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Girls Season 3 Episode 6 Recap: “Everybody Knows I’m The Sunchip Guy”

The title Girls has always been a bit of a misnomer. One would think after seeing an HBO promotional poster with four girls promoting a show called Girls that the show would be about those four girls. Maybe the show would focus on one girl more than the others, but, like some other HBO show about four women balancing life and love in New York City that I can’t remember the name of right now, it would more or less be about all of them and the specific nature of female friendship. But Girls never really turned out to be the millennial version of the show that’s title is slipping my mind. Lena Dunham has always had a lot to say about love and sex and companionship of all kinds, but more and more she’s wanted to explore what it means to want to be an artist in this generation. Of the four titular girls, Hannah is the only one who aspires to make a living creating art—although, Jessa probably sees herself as some sort of performance piece. Girls has always been about 50% Hannah and 50% everyone else, but this season it’s been about an 80/20 split. The show can’t even pretend to just be about girls any more, considering how much screen time Ray has been getting compared to Jessa and Shosh.

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Some Quick Thoughts on The Failures of American Horror Story: Coven

American Horror Story: Coven had no idea what it wanted to be. A modern-day witch soap opera with a rich mythology? A parable of race relations in Post-Katrina New Orleans? An ode to the feminine mystique? A metaphor for the gay experience? A redemption tale? Coven would be one thing for a couple of episodes and then completely change gears. The first two seasons of American Horror Story threw a bunch of plots in the air in the first six or seven episodes and then used their back halves to fit all of the disparate pieces together into something resembling a cohesive narrative; both, more or less, succeeded. Coven, on the other hand, introduced a lot of threads and themes only to get bored of them one by one. So much of the first half of the season foreshadowed some fast approaching war, one that threatened the very survival of this coven. First, it was Angela Basset and her voodoo practitioners. Then, it was Jessica Lange, the vengeful outgoing Supreme. Then, it was witch hunters! Witch hunters with suits and ties and conference tables! But there never was any war. Coven squandered all of its narratives on moments: burning Frances Conroy at the stake—twice; Taissa Farmiga fighting zombies with chainsaws; Angela Basset slithering around and gobbling down scenery; black men and women being shot down while, upstairs, Kathy Bates’s decapitated head cries along to “Free At Last”.
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